Preventive Care

At Lombard Animal Hospital our goal is to tailor vaccine protocols to the individual patient. Our goal is to protect from disease without giving unnecessary or excessive vaccines. We base our vaccine protocol on American Animal Hospital Association (AAHA) guidelines.

Vaccines in Dogs

We routinely vaccinate for Distemper, Adenovirus, Parvovirus Bordetella, Rabies and Leptospirosis. Puppies should receive a series of vaccines beginning at 6-8 weeks of age until 16 weeks of age. This is because nursing puppies ingest antibodies from their mothers which provide early protection against infectious disease. However, they also neutralize the immunizing agents in vaccines. Maternal antibodies naturally decline during the first three to four months of life and eventually disappear.bnr-small19

  • DAP protects against Distemper, Adenovirus type 2, and Parvovirus. Distemper is a highly contagious viral disease carried by raccoons. It causes diarrhea, fever, nasal and ocular discharge progressing to neurological symptoms like seizing. It is often fatal and the best protection is vaccination. Parvovirus causes severe vomiting and diarrhea and immunosuppression. Mortality is 60% and puppies are the most susceptible because of their limited body reserves. Adenovirus can cause liver and eye problems and can result in death or chronic illness. Puppies should start DAP series at 8 weeks of age and receive boosters every 4 weeks until 16 weeks of age. Dogs older than 16 weeks receive 2 initial boosters then an annual booster, then a booster every 3 years. Do not take your puppy to places where other dogs go until fully vaccinated.
  • Rabies bats in Oregon primarily spread this viral disease. It is 100% fatal once an animal or person is infected. The first vaccine is good for 1 year, and then the following boosters are good for 3 years. This vaccine is required for licensing, which is required by law for all dogs and cats in Multnomah County. We are legally required to report all rabies vaccines given in Multnomah County. The receptionist staff can help you make sure Multnomah County Animal Services has record that your pet has been properly vaccinated against rabies or you can visit www.multcopets.org.
  • Leptospirosis is a bacterial infection resulting from contaminated water or contact with the urine of infected wildlife and rodents. It causes symptoms of kidney and liver failure. This illness can be transmitted to humans by contact through breaks in the skin or mucus membranes.
  • Bordetella protects against the most common bacterial form of kennel cough. It does not protect against all causes. Symptoms include coughing, retching, sneezing, eye and nasal discharge and rarely pneumonia. We recommend vaccination for dogs that go to places such as kennels, daycare, groomers, shows or dog parks.

Vaccines in Cats

We routinely vaccinate for Rabies and HCP. We give FeLV vaccine to cats that may go outside.

  • HCP is a combination vaccine containing herpes virus, calicivirus, and panleukopenia. Rhinotracheitis is a herpes virus that can cause chronic upper respiratory and eye infections. Calcivirus can also cause upper respiratory disease. Panleukopenia is a very contagious virus that suppresses the immune system and causes severe diarrhea. It has a 75-90% mortality rate in unvaccinated individuals.Kittens should receive a series of 2 boosters at 8 and 12 weeks old, then again in 1 year, then every 3 years.
  • bnr-small20Rabies is a viral disease primarily spread by bats in Oregon. It is 100% fatal once an animal or person is infected. The first vaccine is good for 1 year, and then the following boosters are good for 3 years. This vaccine is required for licensing, which is required by law for all dogs and cats in Multnomah County. We are legally required to report all rabies vaccines given in Multnomah County. The reception staff can help you make sure Multnomah County Animal Services has record that your pet has been properly vaccinated against rabies or you can visit www.multcopets.org.
  • FeLV is a viral illness spread from mother to kittens, from bite wounds, or mutual grooming. It can cause cancer or predispose the cat to secondary infection due to immunosuppression. Most cats that are infected by this virus die within 3 years. Some become chronic carriers and do not become sick. All kittens and cats at risk should be tested and vaccinated with two vaccines 3 to 4 weeks apart and then annually boosted. Indoor only cats do not need this vaccine. We recommend all kittens be vaccinated at least twice as their lifestyle may change at a later point.