Acupuncture in Practice: Damp Heat

August 16, 2018

Posted By : Amanda

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Welcome to Acu in Practice! All of the heat and humidity in the environment right now has me thinking about the effects of Damp Heat on the body. Damp Heat, according Traditional Chinese Medicine (TCM), can be responsible for both external and internal conditions. Examples of external Damp Heat include “hot spots” or moist exudative dermatitis, malodorous ear infections with discharge, and pyoderma (skin infection usually with some type of exudate or pustules). Examples of internal Damp Heat include irritable bowel disease, pancreatitis, uterine/reproductive infections and some types of asthma.

Because TCM is applied by identifying patterns in addition to or without a definitive diagnosis, we can help these patients by treating acupuncture points that clear Damp Heat from the body, even if we are not certain of the initial cause.

One of the many acu points that clears Damp Heat but may not get enough attention in practice is Spleen 9. Here is a Re-Fresh on Spleen 9:

Indications: Benefits the Lower Jiao and the Spleen functions of transformation and transportation; regulates the water passages; and dispels Dampness and Heat.

Western Applications: Edema, abdominal pain and distention, diarrhea, incontinence, dysuria, cystitis, irregular estrous cycle, and genital and stifle pain.

Location:
Canine: In the depression just ventral to the medial condyle of the tibia, caudal to the caudal border of the tibia, between it and the gastrocnemius muscle.

Equine: In the depression just ventral to the medial condyle of the tibia, caudal to the caudal border of the tibia, over the popliteus m. and cranial to the saphenous vein.

This post is created by Nell Ostermeier, DVM, CVA and is intended for informational use, not to replace medical advice.

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